Fujifilm X100V… Finally?

Fujifilm has launched the all new X100V, successor to X100F. Is this the ultimate X100 series camera? As of now, of course it is. A friend of mine asked me whether this will tempt me to get one. Well, let’s take a closer look on my complaints about X100F and see what’s fixed:

The gimmicky ISO dial

Yes, the new ISO dial on X100V makes more sense in terms of usability. This is certainly a plus point and Fujifilm has done a good job in redesigning this part.

The quirky EVF

EVF has been upgraded to have higher resolution and magnification, which is a plus.

The wrongly placed Q button

Yup, that’s fixed as well. Q button has been moved further away from where you would naturally grab the camera, so no more accidental press on it with X100V.

Software problem that are still unknown

AF point does not follow when you rotate your camera between portrait and landscape mode, only horizon level without tilt angle level, need to turn on camera to view pictures taken, all these are unknown. Have they been fixed via firmware update for X100F? Or are they fixed/improved with X100V? Can’t comment further unless I get a hands on with the camera.

Exposure compensation dials

I prefer them to stay flushed with the top plate, this is not major and has not changed. But Fujifilm has improved the design around the ISO dial and made it more compact and flushed with the top plate, which is pretty nice. I complaint that the dials were a little too stiff, not sure whether things are better with the new camera (but it is minor issue).

The lens and their “world fastest auto focus”

Everyone complaints about the lens on previous X100 series camera, and finally they have updated the design and lens formula. This is welcomed for sure.

Okay, they didn’t claimed world fastest, but Fujifilm did always boast about their AF performance and yet has always failed to deliver their promise. Is the AF performance going to be better? I doubt. It seems to me that the lens still require the AF motor to move the whole lens group while focusing, if X100V is still designed this way without better or stronger AF motor, the AF speed will not caught up, and not to mentioned it’s AF performance in video shooting. This is of course going to be clear when more reviews surface online, or when I get a hands on with the camera itself. For now, I’ll remain skeptical on this. I wished Fujifilm would have redevelop the lens inside out, but I think their priority is to remain backward compatibility with the conversion lenses, hence limiting themselves. It’s not a right or wrong thing, just a matter of choice and decision made.

So?

The addition of weather sealing and flip screen are also welcomed, though they are not among the top of my wishlist. So… all in all, will this be the camera that makes me go back to Fujifilm?

At this point of time… no. For now, I think the form factor of X-E3 + XF23mm F/2 R WR makes more sense, mainly due to the fact that I don’t use the OVF on X100 series at all. I still don’t find it useable, and that’s coming from someone who shoots Leica rangefinder for quite some time. Of course the X-E3 is not weather sealed, and there is a reason for that (price and differentiation come to mind). I’m not sure whether the lens performance  will be better, but I’m pretty sure the AF performance will be better on the XF23mm F/2 R WR. X100 series is a little more compact (but X-E3 is pretty small and light too), other than that… I can’t think of much advantages of using a X100 series camera over the X-E series camera.

Of course that’s not the point. After all, people purchased the X100 series camera not because it is the “best” camera with “best” specification, but because it is arguably the “best” looking camera, or best-Leica-look-alike camera out there (I can’t deny that this was one of the reason why I bought the X100 series in the past :P) where money can buy.

So am I saying X100V is not worth the upgrade? To be honest, I believe the updates here are substantial enough for even X100F users to justify for an upgrade. But for those who are new to this camera series, I would suggest you to think twice on your priority before pulling your trigger. For me, I have sort through my priorities and decided that this form factor is not for me at this point of time, no matter how pretty and good the camera is, that’s all. Of course priorities will change, who knows in the future I would ended up coming back for more X100 series camera? For those who bought it, I believe you will enjoy it very much as I enjoyed using my X100F in the past. Till then.

Goodbye Fujifilm X100F

This is the second time I’m parting with Fujifilm, and X100 series camera as well. The first X100 series I owned was the X100S, and I got the X100F in 2017. I shoot almost exclusively with only this camera for about a year or so, and I owned both the wide angle and telephoto conversion lenses.

To be honest, the form factor and overall usability of the X100 series has always been good. If you just want to pack light and be casual, it’s a great everyday carry camera. I shot with it with me on my trip to Hanoi and Taipei, and it’s very enjoyable to lug it around for snapshot moment.

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This is not to say the camera is not capable of delivering professional work. There are those who shoot professional street photography work with this camera, and I do enjoyed using it on the street as well. My only complaint will probably be the lack of weather sealing and subpar lens performance when shooting close up and in wider aperture. The lens seriously needs to be updated in the next iteration.

Of course being a compact fixed lens camera, it is what it is. If you can live with the limitations, you will be happy using it. I had been using it solely for the past one year as I was trying to figure out what’s next. After I decided to purchase the Sony A7 III, I gave it a hard thought to decide whether or not to keep the X100F. In the end, I decided to let it go.

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Well, I could have keep it and use it along with my Sony A7 III, but that means I will need to deal with two camera systems and process two different types of raw files. Anyway, since I had decided to move on, I figure I’ll just reset my stuff and stay focus with one for now. Anyway, I can use the extra cash as well.

Goodbye X100F. You had served me well. I will still hold a soft spot for you in my heart, and hopefully you will evolved to a better camera in next iteration. Till then.

Personal Project: Photobook on my Vietnam Trip

 

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As mentioned earlier, I had the opportunity to travel to Vietnam for business purpose, and I was able to squeeze out some free time to travel  around Hanoi and it’s nearby provinces during my short stay there in April. Since then, I had compiled some of the pictures and my writings into this book. It’s more like a sharing of my thoughts, feelings and emotions while travelling to Vietnam for the very first time.

And again, I would like to apologize that this book was written in Chinese instead of English. As with my other personal projects, I’m more comfortable to write in Chinese, as I felt that I can express myself better through this language. For those who are interested to check it out, please feel free to click on the link here to download and read on your own leisure. Hope you enjoy this book of mine. Do drop me a comment if there’s any.

Thank you and have a nice day!

Goodbye Fujifilm GW690III

“What was all the hype on medium format?”

That’s the question I had awhile ago, and in order to answer it, I got myself the Fujifilm GW690III, a medium format fixed lens camera. It shoot film at 6×9 ratio, probably the largest you can get, completely manual for both focusing and exposure, built like a tank, and works like a charm. I wanted a taste of medium format myself, so instead of buying a digital back with interchangeable lens system, I decided to just keep it simple.

The Fujifilm GW690III was a great medium format camera. But why I decided to sell it? Well, my issue was not too much on the camera itself, but rather on handling of film. As the negative was so huge, it’s hard to get it flatten for a proper scan, and you really need a good scanner to extract the very best bits of it. Hence, I can’t do the negatives justice, and getting them scanned by the lab cost a bomb.

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So is medium format really worth the hassle? Well, it really depends on what you want to use it for. For landscape, hell yes. The amount of details you can extract, the huge print you can enlarge and make, it’s really jaw dropping coming from full frame. The same advantages go to shooting still life products and portraitures. Everything else? Well, I personally don’t see a need but you will be your own judge.

Looking beyond film, currently there were a few high megapixels full frame digital cameras that offer similar advantages at a much lower price point, hence eating into the pie of medium format cameras. However, digital medium format still has some other advantages (such as tonality) that position them better, but that’s a whole different story that I’ll not go through today. All in all, I really enjoyed using this camera and shooting with medium format, but it’s not what I need at the moment. So it’s time to say goodbye and hopefully someone will make better use of it. Till then.

It’s been a year…

Yup. It’s been a year since the last time I actually touch my Leica M camera. Did I lost my love to it? Well, not really. I bet I will still enjoy using one when I pick it up. Life has been busy and fast paced that I don’t really have time to “slow down” myself. I had been using mainly my Fujifilm X100F for the past one year. Is it a better camera? Well, certainly not. There are so many shortfalls on this camera that drove me nuts at times, but then again, as you worked around its limitations, you will still be able to live with it. Each camera has their pros and cons to begin with.

So why am I not using it more often? For the things I shot for the past one year, they are mainly activities and events surrounding my study, which either was fast paced or require the use of flash. Can a Leica M shoot fast pace subject? Of course it can. Can a Leica M shoot with flash? Of course it can. On the first point, I would probably put the blame on myself for not being able to use the camera fluently. On the second point, I’m still new to using flash, and I don’t think I can juggle between focusing, composing and setting up flash at the same time.

There are limitations on me, and certainly there are limitations as well on the camera. But when it comes to making a decision on which camera to use, I had decided to walk the easier path: go with automation. For my personal stuff I can afford to make mistakes and not getting the shot, but for things that I need to deliver, I will have to use something that I’m more comfortable with in delivering the required result, and in this case, I have chosen to use my X100F over my M.

And then I started to ponder again whether I should still keep my Leica M. For me, what I enjoyed the most is the experience of shooting with a rangefinder, not a Leica. Perhaps I should just use my Zeiss Ikon when I wanted to fiddle with rangefinder camera. But that brings up another question to ponder… should I still continue to shoot film? I sold off my Fujifilm GW690III Medium Format Film camera recently, I had enough fun with medium format, and the problem dealing with medium format film was a pain that overweights the joy of using one. I’ll talk about this more in a separate post.

I still has an affection to analogue photography. I’ll continue to shoot film for the time being, but as my favourite films are being axed from the production one after another, I may stop shooting film eventually. As for my Leica M? I’ll probably need to pick it up for a spin again someday and asked myself what to do next. Till then.